Contributors

Hannah Bellwoar is an associate professor of English at Juniata College, where she teaches professional and digital writing and is the administrator of the professional writing program. Her research interests include digital literacies, undergraduate research in writing studies, professional writing and usability studies, and the rhetoric of health and medicine. Her work has been published in Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology and Pedagogy, Harlot Journal, and Technical Communication Quarterly.

Mollie Boynton is a recent graduate of the University of Montevallo, with a Bachelor’s of Science in Communication Studies with coordinating minors in Art and Game Studies and Design. She has presented at the National Communication Association’s annual conference on several gaming topics, such as toxic player behavior and let’s play videos. Currently, she is working at Bungie, Inc., as a member of the Destiny Player Support team.

Daniel Frank, PhD, teaches multimedia, technical writing, and first year composition in the Writing Program at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dan’s research interests include game-based pedagogy, virtual text-spaces, passionate affinity spaces, and connected learning. As a gamer and a performer, Dan is continually interested in helping students find their own passion as they learn to create, play, and communicate research, argumentation, and writing across genres. You can follow him on Twitter at @Dmifrank.

Geoffrey Gimse (@textandhubris) is a PhD candidate in Professional and Technical Communication at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. His research focuses on the relationships between digital technology, publics, organizations, and the individuals that comprise and build them. His current work examines the rise of digital network architectures and their influence on the broader social imagination.

Courtney Herber (@courtney_herber) is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Courtney’s research centers on foreign-born consort queens in the early modern British Isles with interests in the performative nature of queenship and how women were represented on stages across Europe in the early modern period. Some of her recent publications include chapters in The Palgrave Handbook of Shakespeare’s Queens and in the forthcoming volume Remembering Queens and Kings of Early Modern Europe.

Cathlena Martin, PhD, is the Associate Professor of Game Studies and Design and Director of the Honors Program at the University of Montevallo. Her publications cover topics including Peter Pan and video games, play in Ender’s Game, and game adaptations of children’s texts. She has most recently published a co-authored book chapter with Dr. Benton Tyler in The Role-Playing Society on the influence of tabletop role-playing games on board and card games and a single authored article in the American Journal of Play on children’s literature’s role in the early history of role-playing games.

Ethan Rubin has worked in the education field for the past decade, with experience ranging from classroom teaching to youth work in national parks and construction sites. In 2013, he was awarded a Gates Cambridge scholarship, through which he earned an MPhil in Education. Ethan has simultaneously maintained a music career as a violinist and bassist, playing in a wide variety of improvisatory and collaborative projects. He will begin a doctoral program in education in the fall of 2019.

Kenton Taylor Howard (@kenton_howard) is a Games and Interactive Media Instructor at the University of Central Florida in Orlando, Florida and a PhD candidate in UCF’s Texts and Technology PhD program. He has most recently published in the Proceedings of the Digital Games Research Association Conference. He researches teaching, video games, and critical theory, and his dissertation work explores the intersection of all these areas. He plans to build a video game as part of his dissertation as well.

Benton Tyler, PhD, is a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Montevallo in Montevallo, Alabama. He received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Mississippi. His research interests and publications lie primarily in the fields of combinatorics and game theory. He has a co-authored several articles with Dr. Cathlena Martin, including one on the influence of tabletop role-playing games on board and card games.

Stephen Gilbert, Jesus “Chuy” Guizar, Will Kirkpatrick, and Sara Perry are all graduates of the University of Montevallo with BAs in History, Art, English, and English respectively. All minored in Game Studies and Design and conducting Undergraduate Research with Dr. Martin in Fall 2017 and Spring 2018. Follow them @SpaceLionGames on Twitter.

Cathlena Martin, PhD, is the Associate Professor of Game Studies and Design and Director of the Honors Program at the University of Montevallo. Her publications cover topics including Peter Pan and video games, play in Ender’s Game, and game adaptations of children’s texts. She has most recently published a co-authored book chapter with Dr. Benton Tyler in The Role-Playing Society on the influence of table-top role-playing games on board and card games and a single authored article in the American Journal of Play on children’s literature’s role in the early history of role-playing games.

Wendi Sierra is an Assistant Professor of English and Interactive Media at St. John Fisher College. She teaches courses at the intersection of game studies and rhetoric, including a two semester video game design sequence, Video Game History, and Stories Games Tell. She is one of the founding designers of Cs The Day, the official conference game of CCCC, and is currently at work on GradLife: The RPG and a language learning game for Oneida Nation of Wisconsin. Some of her recent publications include “Gaming Across the Years: Gotta Catch Em All Together” in The Pokémon Go Phenomenon and “Creating Space: Building Digital Games” in The Proceedings of the Annual Computers and Writing Conference: Volume 1. You can find her online at WendiSierra.com.

Miranda Suarez is an alumna of Juniata College. She graduated May 2018 with a BA in Interactive Media Writing. Suarez has dedicated most of her academic career to researching digital narratives. She wrote a paper on video game avatars’ effect on human identity and presented her research on video games as academic inquiry at the Juniata College Liberal Arts Symposium. She spent a year abroad in Japan and New Zealand and hopes to eventually return to Japan to teach English.